What Does A Power Of Attorney Do?

Powers of attorney are a vitally important component of preparations for the future. They directly name specific individuals who you wish to control key decisions when you are no longer able to do so. Without them, significant decisions regarding your health and finances can be taken out of your hands and handled against your wishes.

It is important that you have these directives in place now. You never know what the future holds, but you can be prepared for whatever happens.

Ensure Loved Ones Have The Authority to Make Decisions and Pay Bills When You Cannot

At The Law Office of Ryan C. Moe, PLLC, we carefully instruct our clients in this process, providing them with the information they need to create powers of attorney directives that spell out their wishes. Our law firm will assist in the drafting of all necessary directives, including:

  • Statutory durable powers of attorney — This names an individual to handle your affairs and decisions should you become incapacitated and unable to do so yourself. These individuals also make decisions regarding your assets and payments during the period that you are incapacitated or for another predetermined amount of time.
  • Medical powers of attorney — This will allow the named individual to make decisions regarding your health care and treatment should you become incapacitated and unable to do so yourself.
  • HIPAA release — For your power of attorney to make essential medical decisions, your medical records must be released to him or her. Without a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) release, valuable time can be lost to securing the records.

We will ensure that you create all of the directives needed to effectively manage your decisions and actions in case of incapacity. To arrange an initial consultation to discuss your situation, please contact our office today at 210-614-6400.

Powers of Attorney for Children

Powers of attorney can also be a useful tool for children. Without having to complete a guardianship, parents can name a relative or other trusted adult to assume specific parental rights for a period of time. This allows another individual to carry out duties on behalf of the parent without the parent relinquishing rights.

This differs from a guardianship in that care and custody of the child only last for a determined amount of time, rather than permanently as with a full surrender of parental rights.